Forthcoming Projects

These are our lab's projects that are currently in development. Scroll to see all of the projects we are working on launching soon.

acl.jpg

CNL Project Team: Dr. Ledwidge, Ryan Guggenheim ('23) and Harry Costlow ('23)

image.png
ryan guggenheim.jpg
harry.jpg

This project is in collaboration with other BW investigators and clinician-scientists in NEO

01

Biomechanics and the Brain after ACL injury

Launching soon in Spring 2022!

 

Rehabilitation from Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries is a long 9–12-month recovery and can negatively impact an athlete’s long-term physical and psychological health. Unfortunately, 25% of young athletes who return to sport after this recovery will experience a second ACL injury. In this study, we’re motivated to uncover the neural, cognitive, and motor risk factors that may be involved in risk for a second ACL injury.

       Participants in this study will complete 2-2.5 hours of testing at Baldwin Wallace University. This will include having your brain activity recorded using EEG and you also would complete a series of sporting maneuvers during 3D motion capture. EEG is a non-invasive technique that uses scalp electrodes to measure the activity of your brain. You can learn more about how we use EEG in our lab and what this experience would be like for you by clicking here.

athlete.jpg

CNL Project Team: Dr. Ledwidge, Kailee Thadeus (GRA), Zach Milko (’22)

image.png
Kailee thadeus.jpg
Zach Milko.jpg

02

Retired Athletes Study

Timeline: Expected to launch in Summer 2022! Check back in soon!

The purpose of this online study is to examine psychological, cognitive, and social health in former college athletes, particularly those with a history of concussion or participation in contact sport. The last decade of brain injury research has been highlighted by research focused on long-term cognitive health in retired professional football athletes. However, this research fails to generalize to the majority of former elite athletes who played sports other than football. Therefore, our motivation for this study is to characterize psychosocial health in a generalizable sample of retired college athletes. Our motivation for this project is to examine health-promoting factors which may predict positive psychological and cognitive health in former athletes, including those with a history of brain injury.

Participants in this study complete a series of online questionnaires about their sports and concussion history, psychological and emotional health, social experiences, and mental functioning.

03

Pediatric Brain Injury Project

Timeline for this project: Expected to launch in 2023! We’re hard at work developing the research procedures and tasks for this project. Check back in soon!

 

Approximately 475,000 children in the U.S. suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every year. Some children will experience mental health challenges after their brain injury, which may continue into adolescence and adulthood. We’re motivated to carry out this project to better understand how neural circuits of language comprehension may be involved in this risk. Children in this study (8-12 years of age) will have their brain activity recorded using electroencephalography (EEG) while they complete one language and one attention task. EEG is a non-invasive technique that uses scalp electrodes to measure the activity of your brain. You can learn more about how we use EEG in our lab and what this experience would be like for you by clicking here. Children will also complete a series of cognitive tests. Parents will complete reports of their child’s behavior.

peds.jpg

CNL Project Team: Dr. Ledwidge, Bailey Hall (’24), Sarah Menke (’24), Mattie Flynn (’24), Hannah Dodson (’25)

image.png
bailey hall.jpg
sarah.jpg
mattie flynn.jpg
hannah.jpg